HealthMine Blog

The HealthMine Blog

The Personalized Diet

January 11, 2016
HealthMine Team
The ebb and flow of diet and nutrition advice coming out of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has varied to such extremes that it almost gives one whiplash.
 
The many revisions of the food pyramid have alternatingly demonized and praised red meat, sugar, carbohydrates, etc. The list goes on and on.
 
Increasingly, a new narrative has been gaining steam -- not another call for a revised food pyramid, but rather a recommendation to decentralize the discussion. Diet, a recent study from the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests, should be personalized.


 
“The same dietary advice cannot be good for everyone, because we are all different,” said Eran Elinav, an immunologist at the Institute. In the future, new ways to determine the nutritional needs of an individual may come from genetic makeup, gut bacteria, body type, and chemical exposures.
 
Institute scientists found significant differences in glucose responses from 800 individuals who were all fed the same foods. The findings challenge the utility of the glycemic index, which determines the effect of certain foods on an individual’s blood glucose or blood sugar, since they indicate that foods with the same score on the glycemic index may affect different people in different ways.
 
As we all struggle to create balance on our plates, we should remember this: as with all things in health, one size does not fit all.
 
For the full article, click here.
 
[Photo Credit: JD Hancock on Flickr via Creative Commons 2.0]

​Top 10 Health Insurance Searches Reveal Healthcare Illiteracy

January 5, 2016
HealthMine Team
Here are the top 10 health insurance search terms from UnitedHealth Group’s terms glossary:
 
  1. Deductible
  2. Co-insurance, coinsurance
  3. Appeal
  4. Coverage determination
  5. Grievance
  6. HSA, health savings account
  7. Cost sharing
  8. Co-pay, copayment
  9. OOP, out of pocket (as in OOP maximum or OOP limit)
  10. EOB, Explanation of Benefits
 
Health insurance literacy has been an ongoing issue as consumers become more and more responsible for their healthcare, both in terms of sharing the cost of coverage and in understanding which benefits they want and how to access them.
 
As we increasingly enter a digital age of healthcare, it is not only challenging to speak health insurance, but also to speak “health data” which is leaving American consumers confused and, even worse, shut out.
 
According to an October 2015 HealthMine survey of 502 insured U.S. consumers, 53 percent of people say they can’t access all of their health data from a computer. This is despite the fact that 74 percent of consumers say easy electronic access to health data would improve their knowledge of their health and improve communication with their physicians.
 
HealthMine also found that 38 percent of consumers are confused about what their lifestyle/behavioral health data means, and only 42 percent know what actions they need to take after looking at this data. So, if they can get to their medical record, they will need an interpreter to understand what it means.


 
This is a problem because 1 in 2 people have a chronic condition--many of whom don’t know it yet--and accessible, clear, meaningful health information could help prevent and uncover it much sooner.
 
If we can raise the level of healthcare literacy, encompassing both insurer terminology and personal health data, we can be more knowledgeable And with that knowledge comes power: the ability to improve health outcomes.
 
Click here for the full article in Kaiser Health News.
 
Click here for the full article in Employee Benefit News.
[Photo Credit: Dennis Brekke on Flickr via Creative Commons 2.0]

You Probably Don't Own Your Health Data

December 31, 2015
HealthMine Team

HealthMine recently surveyed 502 consumers about their health data. Below are some misconceptions and perceptions about health data, and how you can help empower plan members to take control of their health guided by their own data.

Only 41% of people believe they own their health data. They are right; by law, patients only own their medical records in one out of 50 states: New Hampshire. For most, health data is broken into pieces and hidden in different locations. Part may be with their primary care physician (if they have one). Part may be with specialists, part in a hospital or urgent care clinic. And that’s not even considering where prescription records are stored. Or, data from health activity tracking devices, or digital apps. Even when it comes to health information collected on a Fitbit, digital heart-rate monitor or other device or app, 37% of consumers don’t believe they are the owners of their health data.

Health Data is Disconnected

39% of people are unable to access all of their clinical and behavioral health data from a single source. Why is our health data so fragmented? It’s a two way street; 45% of consumers have never tried to share data from their health devices and apps with their doctors. At the end of the day, all of the parts never add up to a whole.

Personal Health Data Doesn’t Always Make Sense

Even when members can get a hold of their health information, it can be confusing. 42-56% of consumers say they “sometimes” understand their clinical health data. 38% are confused about what the data from their digital devices and apps means, and only 42% know what actions they need to take after looking at this data. We collecting terabytes of data that has the potential to illuminate member’s health, yet most consumers are still in the dark.

We need to be empowered with our health data. As a health plan sponsor, you can help your people access, own and understand their health data. Here’s how:

1) Provide digital access to clinical health data anytime, anywhere.

2) Connect behavioral/lifestyle data to an individual’s personal health record, so they can see the big picture in one place.

3) Offer clear analysis of health data so individuals understand what the numbers mean.

4) Provide guidance on what health actions individuals should take and when.

5) Offer motivation—and incentive as necessary—to follow-through. Owning your health data is essential to managing your health and healthcare dollars. At HealthMine, we are building products to help people own their health. Let’s remove the barriers to access, unite the disparate pieces, and empower ourselves.

Wearable Data does not Equal Consumer Wellness

December 21, 2015
HealthMine Team



A November 2015 McKinsey report highlighted the role of big data in medicine, lauding the fact that wearable devices like Fitbits and Jawbones give individuals access to their health data in an unprecedented way. However, while wearables and the big data they gather may have the potential to transform medicine and wellness, we still have a long way to go.

The promise of big data applied to wellness is the ability to build predictive models based on greater volume and continuity of an individual’s health data. Before wearables, the only health data consumers had was that collected in the 10 mins per year they spent in front of their doctor. Year-round information collected by a Fitbit, for example, could provide a more complete picture of a person’s health. Utilized to its full potential, it could enable doctors to “longitudinally monitor” an individual’s state of health—including cardiovascular health, sleeping patterns, fitness levels, and nutrition.

All of the potential gains from wearables in medicine that the article highlights affect the usage of big data in a clinical research or hospital setting. But the fact is, 45% of consumers have never tried to share their self-collected data with all of their providers, according to HealthMine’s research.

So how can this data help individuals the other 8,735 hours each year when they aren’t in the doctor’s office? Is it just data, or does it have meaning to the consumer, impacting the choices they make about their health? This is where the volume of health data being collected is falling short of making real change.

For example, HealthMine’s consumer wellness research revealed that 38% of consumers are confused about what the data collected by their wearable devices means, and only 42% know what actions they need to take after looking at this data. So you have your metabolic heart rate and the number of steps you took today—now what?

A data deluge does not equal wellness. Data must directly inform what one should do with their health — and better health is the real payoff.